chicagopubliclibrary:

Harvard Discovers Three Of Its Library Books Are Bound In Human Flesh
From Roadtrippers:

A few years ago, three separate books were discovered in Harvard University’s library that had particularly strange-looking leather covers. Upon further inspection, it was discovered that the smooth binding was actually human flesh… in one case, skin harvested from a man who was flayed alive.
As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research.
One of the books includes an inscription in purple cursive:
"The bynding of this booke is all that remains of my dear friende Jonas Wright, who was flayed alive by the Wavuma on the Fourth Day of August, 1632. King Mbesa did give me the book, it being one of poore Jonas chiefe possessions, together with ample of his skin to bynd it. Requiescat in pace."

chicagopubliclibrary:

Harvard Discovers Three Of Its Library Books Are Bound In Human Flesh

From Roadtrippers:

A few years ago, three separate books were discovered in Harvard University’s library that had particularly strange-looking leather covers. Upon further inspection, it was discovered that the smooth binding was actually human flesh… in one case, skin harvested from a man who was flayed alive.

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research.

One of the books includes an inscription in purple cursive:

"The bynding of this booke is all that remains of my dear friende Jonas Wright, who was flayed alive by the Wavuma on the Fourth Day of August, 1632. King Mbesa did give me the book, it being one of poore Jonas chiefe possessions, together with ample of his skin to bynd it. Requiescat in pace."

1,113 notes

A painter paints the appearance of things, not their objective correctness, in fact he creates new appearances of things.
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (via artnet)

343 notes

Stunning Illustration by Tavis Cobu
Illustration via WE AND THE COLOR

Stunning Illustration by Tavis Cobu

Illustration via WE AND THE COLOR

101 notes

vintageski:

Charlie Chaplin on the set of The Gold Rush, 1925.

vintageski:

Charlie Chaplin on the set of The Gold Rush, 1925.

61 notes

thecolorblu:
Eartha Kitt teaching a dance class. Yes, that is James Dean in the background

thecolorblu:

Eartha Kitt teaching a dance class. Yes, that is James Dean in the background

(Source: vintageblackglamour)

5,078 notes

Arsenal’s Instagram posted this in time for the unveiling of Dennis Bergkamp’s statue at Arsenal Stadium (okay, Emirates Stadium).
Love. this. man.

theessentialshandbook:

Ten Rules for Writers by Zadie Smith
1. When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing this than anything else.
2. When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.
3. Don’t romanticise your “vocation”. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no “writer’s lifestyle”. All that matters is what you leave on the page.
4. Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without telling yourself that the things you can’t do aren’t worth doing. Don’t mask self-doubt with contempt.
5. Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.
6. Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. The presence of a crowd won’t make your writing any better than it is.
7. Work on a computer that is disconnected from the ­internet.
8. Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.
9. Don’t confuse honours with achievement.
10. Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it. Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.
via The Guardian

theessentialshandbook:

Ten Rules for Writers by Zadie Smith

1. When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books. Spend more time doing this than anything else.

2. When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.

3. Don’t romanticise your “vocation”. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no “writer’s lifestyle”. All that matters is what you leave on the page.

4. Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without telling yourself that the things you can’t do aren’t worth doing. Don’t mask self-doubt with contempt.

5. Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.

6. Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. The presence of a crowd won’t make your writing any better than it is.

7. Work on a computer that is disconnected from the ­internet.

8. Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.

9. Don’t confuse honours with achievement.

10. Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand – but tell it. Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.

via The Guardian

(Source: arssociety)

1,580 notes

If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time (or the tools) to write. Simple as that.

72 notes

A non-writing writer is a monster courting insanity.
Franz Kafka  (via ablogwithaview)

(Source: sicklysentient)

2,032 notes