Am loving my new Jimi Hendrix commemorative US postage stamps! The perfect excuse to send out letters! #areyouexperienced #jimihendrix

Am loving my new Jimi Hendrix commemorative US postage stamps! The perfect excuse to send out letters! #areyouexperienced #jimihendrix

thegetty:

The Perseid meteor shower is upon us!

Every year in mid-August, the Perseids seems to fly out of the constellation Perseus. Perseus, a Greek hero, is depicted here on his vase mid-pursuit of the winged gorgons.

Behave during this time, gorgons, or you might soon be missing your head.

Ladle with Perseus Chasing Gorgons, about 510 - 500 B.C., Attributed to the Theseus Painter. J. Paul Getty Museum.

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wnyc:

The best new Tumblr is Slug Solos (and other great things the internet gave us this week):
http://bit.ly/1AH9sL7

wnyc:

The best new Tumblr is Slug Solos (and other great things the internet gave us this week):

http://bit.ly/1AH9sL7

1,034 notes

Getting used to happiness

thetaoofdana:

Its a habit. 

Its all a habit. 

Happiness is as much a habit as sadness. 

Getting used to being open is as much a habit as being closed off to the world.

Its hard to remember that we choose. Not every moment,  but overall we choose. 

Choose what makes you feel strong and amazing. 

xoxo Dana 

53 notes

tmagazine:

Anton Corbijn’s portrait of Alexander McQueen from the T archives. The full interview with the filmmaker and photographer on music, fashion and going back to the basics. http://nyti.ms/1tJZx2B

tmagazine:

Anton Corbijn’s portrait of Alexander McQueen from the T archives. The full interview with the filmmaker and photographer on music, fashion and going back to the basics. http://nyti.ms/1tJZx2B

1,014 notes

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 
It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress. 

explore-blog:

Fantastic New Yorker profile of Brian Eno. Also see his Oblique Strategies, Eno’s creativity prompts from the 1970s, mentioned in the first paragraph of the piece. 

It’s interesting to consider the parallels with science, where not-knowing is also the building block of “composition,” or progress. 

255 notes

Forgiveness.

The ability to forgive oneself. Stop here for a few breaths and think about this, because it is the key to making art and very possibly the key to finding any semblance of happiness in life. Every time I have set out to translate the book (or story, or hopelessly long essay) that exists in such brilliant detail on the big screen of my limbic system onto a piece of paper (which, let’s face it, was once a towering tree crowned with leaves and a home to birds), I grieve for my own lack of talent and intelligence. Every. Single. Time. Were I smarter, more gifted, I could pin down a closer facsimile of the wonders I see. I believe that, more than anything else, this grief of constantly having to face down our own inadequacies is what keeps people from being writers. Forgiveness, therefore, is key. I can’t write the book I want to write, but I can and will write the book I am capable of writing. Again and again throughout the course of my life I will forgive myself.

1,862 notes

chicagopubliclibrary:

Harvard Discovers Three Of Its Library Books Are Bound In Human Flesh
From Roadtrippers:

A few years ago, three separate books were discovered in Harvard University’s library that had particularly strange-looking leather covers. Upon further inspection, it was discovered that the smooth binding was actually human flesh… in one case, skin harvested from a man who was flayed alive.
As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research.
One of the books includes an inscription in purple cursive:
"The bynding of this booke is all that remains of my dear friende Jonas Wright, who was flayed alive by the Wavuma on the Fourth Day of August, 1632. King Mbesa did give me the book, it being one of poore Jonas chiefe possessions, together with ample of his skin to bynd it. Requiescat in pace."

chicagopubliclibrary:

Harvard Discovers Three Of Its Library Books Are Bound In Human Flesh

From Roadtrippers:

A few years ago, three separate books were discovered in Harvard University’s library that had particularly strange-looking leather covers. Upon further inspection, it was discovered that the smooth binding was actually human flesh… in one case, skin harvested from a man who was flayed alive.

As it turns out, the practice of using human skin to bind books was actually pretty popular during the 17th century. It’s referred to as Anthropodermic bibliopegy and proved pretty common when it came to anatomical textbooks. Medical professionals would often use the flesh of cadavers they’d dissected during their research.

One of the books includes an inscription in purple cursive:

"The bynding of this booke is all that remains of my dear friende Jonas Wright, who was flayed alive by the Wavuma on the Fourth Day of August, 1632. King Mbesa did give me the book, it being one of poore Jonas chiefe possessions, together with ample of his skin to bynd it. Requiescat in pace."

1,222 notes

A painter paints the appearance of things, not their objective correctness, in fact he creates new appearances of things.
Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (via artnet)

361 notes

Stunning Illustration by Tavis Cobu
Illustration via WE AND THE COLOR

Stunning Illustration by Tavis Cobu

Illustration via WE AND THE COLOR

101 notes